Trocadero

(Via VINGT PARIS)

Without a doubt, the 16th arrondissement has a posh reputation. The neighborhoods of Trocadéro and La Muette are elegant, wealthy and conservative. The Passy neighborhood is lovingly called a “village” by Parisians and features chic shopping. Numerous stately art museums, impressive residences and villas bejewel the seizième.

Bordered by the vast and popular Bois du Bologne park to the west, Palais de Chaillot overlooking the Eiffel tower to the east, and L’Etoile du Champs Elysées to the north, the 16th is situated in an exclusive Triangle du Bermuda. Start from the most scenic point of the 16th. From metro Trocadéro(lines 6,9), make like Robert Doisneau and snap an iconic photo of the Eiffel Tower from the Place du Trocadéro. Built in neoclassical style for the 1900 World’s Fair, the Palais de Chaillot imitates the style of Catherine de Medici. The hub of the Place du Trocadéro is a 3000 year‐old Egyptian obelisk that replaced a statue of Louis XV.

Take your morning tea at the exquisite pâtisserie Carette at the intersection of Place du Trocadéro and Place du 11 Novembre. Immaculate rows of rainbow colored macarons wait at attention in jewel‐box cases. Pick up a pink and gold box as a souvenir, and try the macaron au chocolat – Carette’s specialty.

Wednesdays and Saturdays from 7.00am to 3.00pm is the Marché Président Wilson. On Avenue du Président Wilson, between Rue Debrousse and the Place d’Iéna, the gorgeous farmer’s market is plentiful, colorful, and tidy. Make your way along the Avenue du Président Wilson until the Iéna metro station. Several diverse and excellent art museums are in the immediate vicinity. The Musée Guimet on the Place d’Iéna has one of the most stunning collections of Asian art in the world, covering the East from China, Japan, Afghanistan, India and Southeast Asia.

Further down the Avenue du Président Wilson are the Palais du Tokyo and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Fraternal twins, the museums host contemporary and modern art exhibits respectively; the Palais du Tokyo focused on boundary-pushing current artists, the latter dedicated to art of the 20th century.

The incredible terrace between the two museums faces the Seine and Eiffel Tower with café tables between the marble columns. The Black Block concept store inside the Palais du Tokyo Concept is the brainchild of graffiti artist André and sells street art memorabilia and skater knick‐knacks.

Yet another museum within walking distance is the Galerie Baccarat. Yes. That Baccarat. Up the Avenue d’Iéna and to the left on the Place des Etats-Unis you’ll find a universe of crystal, designed by Philippe Starck.

Next, take the metro to La Muette (line 9). First stop is the mega‐chic department store Frank et Fils. It is the only place to assemble your 16th arrondissement ensemble. Tastefully understated boutiques lineRue de Passy. Master chocolatier Régis at number 89 concocts his legendary chocolates fresh daily.

Just off the Rue de Passy is a charming pedestrian street. Following the direction of traffic from Frank et Fils on Rue de Passy, turn right on Rue Vital then a quick right on Rue de l’Annonciation. Closed to cars, the street has cute cafés and food shops galore.

A must‐see for any serious shopper is Le Dépôt Vente de Passy. From the Rue de Passy, follow the direction of traffic for fifteen minutes until the Rue de la Tour and turn left. Le Dépôt Vente de Passy is widely known for its curated collection of lightly worn designer clothes. Suits, scarves, Lanvin dresses, YSL blouses, Dior, Lacroix: the list is as long as Vogue’s September issue. Another dépôt vente a bit further out in the 16th is Réciproque, just next to metro Rue de la Pompe on the street of the same name.

On the western edge of Paris is the lung of the city – the Bois du Bologne. A public green area larger than Central Park, the Bois du Bologne is an excellent place for jogging, boating in its many lakes, picnicking, and horseback riding. After dark the forest becomes the seedy office of transvestites and «ladies of the night».

Two notable establishments in the Bois du Bologne are the timeless Chinese tea room Salon de Thé de Mademoiselle Li and the three Michelin‐starred Le Pré Catelan which resides deep within the park.

The restaurant La Gare is, as its name suggests, a former train station. Think Grand Central Station rather than the Métro. The décor stylishly combines the original art‐deco with modern colors while keeping the menu up to the high standards of the seizième. Throw in a tête-à-tête with the glittering Eiffel Tower in the background and La Gare is an easy winner.

The double Michelin‐starred gastrotemple L’Astrance speaks refinement in every sense. The small, discreet interior belies a restaurant well worthy of its accolades, created by protégés of Alain Passard (L’Arpège). L’Astrance is the apex of fine dining.

Finally, if you have extra time, make a pilgrimage out to the Fondation Le Corbusier by metro Jasmin (9). The iconic architect himself designed the residence, Maison La Roche. The foundation houses his original plans, documents, and personal possessions. The building exhibits hallmarks of Le Corbu; geometric forms, industrial detail, and dusty pink, cucumber, and beige color schemes.

The 16th means many things to different people. Luxury. Aristocracy. Legacy. Les biens élévés. Innate elegance. Trust‐fund kids. Home. Escape.

RESTAURANTS

Salon de Thé de Mademoiselle Li
Entrance Jardin d’Acclimatation/Bois de Boulogne
Ph. 01 40 67 99 99
Hours Sat‐Sun 12pm‐6pm
Metro: Les Sablons (1)

L’Astrance
4 Rue Beethoven
Ph. 01 40 50 84 40
Hours Tues‐F 12:15pm‐1:15pm, 8:15pm‐9:15pm
Metro: Passy (6)

Carette
4 Place du Trocadéro and Place du 11 Novembre
Ph. 01 47 27 98 85
Hours 7/7 7.30am‐12am
Metro: Iéna (9)

Old school tea shop known for its chocolate macarons

La Gare
19 Chaussée de la Muette
Ph. 01 42 15 15 31
Hours 7/7 12‐3pm, 7-11.30pm
Metro: La Muette (9)

Le Pré Catelan
Route de Suresnes, Bois de Boulogne
Ph. 01 44 14 41 00
Hours T‐Sat 12.30-2pm, 7.30-10pm
Metro: Les Sablons, Porte Maillot, Porte Dauphine (1,2)

Has the prestigious Relais & Chateaux status and three Michelin stars.

SHOPPING

Le Dépôt Vente de Passy
14 Rue de la Tour
Ph. 01 45 20 95 21
Hours T‐Sat 10:30am‐7:30pm
Metro: Passy (6)

Réciproque
101 Rue de la Pompe
Ph. 01 47 04 30 28
Hours T‐F 11am‐7:30pm, Sat 10:30am‐7pm
Metro: Rue de la Pompe (9)

Franck et Fils
80 Rue de Passy
Ph. 01 44 14 38 00
Hours M‐F 10am‐7pm, Sat 10am‐8pm
Metro: La Muette (9)

Lynn Adler
4 Rue Guichard
Ph. 01 42 88 27 54
Hours M-Sat 10.30am-7.30pm
Metro: La Muette (9)

Black Block
13 Avenue du Président Wilson
Ph. 01 47 23 37 04
Hours T‐Sun 12pm‐12am
Metro: Iéna (9)

Concept store by graffiti artist André inside the Palais de Tokyo

Régis Chocolatier
89 Rue de Passy
Ph. 01 45 27 70 00
Hours M 1:30pm‐7pm, T‐Sat 10am‐7:15pm, Sun 10am‐1:30pm
Metro: La Muette (9)

Marché Président Wilson
Avenue du Président Wilson, between Rue Debrousse and the place d’Iéna
Hours W 7am‐2:30pm, Sat 7am‐3pm
Metro: Alma‐Marceau, Iéna (9)

Gorgeous farmers’ market, plentiful, colorful, and tidy.

CULTURE

Galerie Musée Baccarat
11 Place des Etats‐Unis
Ph. 01 40 22 11 00
Hours 10am‐6pm, closed Sunday and Tuesday
Metro: Iéna (9)

Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris
11 Avenue du Président Wilson
Ph. 01 53 67 40 00
Hours Tue‐Sun 10am‐6pm
Metro: Alma‐Marceau, Iéna (9)

Palais de Tokyo
13 Avenue du Président Wilson
Ph. 01 81 97 35 88
Hours Weds-Mon 12pm‐12am
Metro: Iéna (9)

Bois de Bologne
Entrance Porte Dauphine
Ph. 01 40 67 90 82
Metro: Les Sablons, Porte Maillot, Porte Dauphine (1,2)

Huge expanse of parkland, criss‐crossed by horsedrawn carriages, hidden pathways, sports fields and stellar picnic spots.

Musée Guimet
6 Place d’Iéna
Ph. 01 56 52 53 00
Hours W‐M 10am‐6pm
Metro: Iéna, Trocadero, Boissière (6,9)

Museum covering Asian art in its entirety.

Fondation le Corbusier
8‐10 Square du Docteur Blanche
Ph. 01 42 88 41 53
Hours M 1:30pm‐6pm, T‐Sat 10am-6pm